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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

And more on the Wildfires

Kate McMaugh, ISSTD News Editor

Just as we reflect on how the Wildfires have come so close to some ISSTD members, and effected the very therapists who are usually there to support others in their trauma, some feel-good news surfaces.

ISSTD Member Susan Pease Banitt, LCSW was contacted by a childhood friend, who is a Social Worker in California, who wanted to know if she could get some copies of Sue’s book: The Trauma Tool Kit: Healing PTSD From the Inside Out (Quest, 2012).

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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

Fire is the Greatest Purifier: A Therapist Reflects on Surviving the California Wildfires

Ericha Scott, PhD

I have wondered, before now, if the dystopian stories embedded in our lives and creative culture prepared us or numbed us for disaster. Now, I can say, they do not do either.

The day before the fire, I noticed and commented on an odd vacuous energy in the air – as if the oxygen had been removed. My colleague noticed it as well. We both knew about the fires in Thousand Oaks, but neither of us imagined the fires were coming our way with a wall of flames – sometimes 100 feet high – in less than 24 hours.

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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

Bringing Trauma Sensitive Art Therapy to Croatia

Tally Tripp, MA, MSW, ATR-BC

This past September, I spent several weeks in Croatia teaching in a first-of-its-kind art therapy postgraduate program at the J.J. Strossmayer University of Osijek, Academy of Arts and Culture. This new art therapy training program was created in collaboration with faculty from the Art Therapy Program at the George Washington University in Washington, DC.

Located in the far northeastern corner of country, and far from the scenic coastal cities that beckon hordes of tourists, Osijek and the surrounding region share a rich history, but one that is also marred by cultural upheaval and violent warfare.

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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

Trauma, Dissociation and Disability: A double-dose of complexity

Valerie Sinason, PhD MACP MInstPsychoanal FIPD

Today, December 3, is International Day for People with Disabilities. What does it mean to have an international disability day?

For those I have spoken to in the U.K., Europe, Australia and South Africa – being named means being seen, valued, represented. We know the impact on black citizens in the U.K. before black actors appeared on television. What does it mean to see no one like you in magazines, comics and films?

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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

A Nation Apologises to Institutional Sexual Assault Survivors

Kate McMaugh, Editor, ISSTD News

In a world where children (or adult survivors) reporting sexual abuse are frequently ignored, accused of lying, or of having over-active imaginations, Australia’s Royal Commission into Institutional Response to Child Sexual Abuse has been a beacon of hope.

The Royal Commission was announced in 2012 and the scope of the 6-year process was enormous, with over 42, 000 calls taken, over 25, 000 letters and emails received, and over 8000 private sessions held for survivors to tell their story.

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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

The Role of Shame within Domestic Violence Relationships

Christine Forner, BA, BSW, MSW, RSW

October is Domestic Violence (DV) Awareness Month in the USA. Many other countries have similar months at different times of the year. During this time it is very important to bring these situations and circumstances to the forefront of our minds.

We know that interpersonally violent situations are very damaging for everyone involved, and children especially. Brain images show us that the brains of children look very similar to the brains of war vets who have PTSD (McCrory, et al., 2011).

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Special Interest Groups

Ritual Abuse, Mind Control and Organised Abuse: Examining our History and Looking Forward

Michael Salter, PhD

I was a teenager when ritual abuse was first reported in Australia. A series of newspaper articles in the mid-1990s claimed that women were entering psychotherapy only to ‘recover’ memories of grotesque and improbable abuse. The general thrust of coverage was that the movement against child abuse had gone too far, and that therapists and social workers were encouraging, and sometimes forcing, children and women to imagine abuse that had never happened.

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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

Congratulations to Kathryn Livingston on Winning Prestigious Award

Melanie Goodwin, in consultation with Sue Richardson and Remy Aquarone

Kathryn Livingston, a long-term member of the ISSTD, has been awarded the prestigious British Empire Medal in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours List for her ‘Services to people with dissociative identity disorder and founder of First Person Plural’. This award is for ‘meritorious service worthy of recognition by the Crown’ and is an extremely important recognition of Kathryn, and through her, trauma and dissociation work in the UK.

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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

35th Meeting of the Interpol Specialists Group on Crimes Against Children – Lyon, France 13-17 Nov 2017

Dr. Michael Salter, PhD

I recently attended the annual meeting of the Interpol working group on crimes against children, which brings together police, non-government organisations and others from around the world to share their experience and developments in the prevention, investigation, prosecution and management of child abuse. The efforts of the Specialists Group have increasingly turned to online child sexual exploitation and the disruption of child abuse material. I was asked to attend and present a seminar based on my research on adult survivors of organized child sexual abuse.

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Trauma & Dissociation in the News

Trauma, Memory and Human Dignity

The International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD) is the oldest organization supporting and educating therapists, researchers, and other professionals in dealing with complex psychological trauma in the world. Over the last century, the subject of psychological trauma, especially in the form of child abuse and neglect, and the sequelae on its victims, has been controversial. Yet, in the last 25 years there has been an increased research and medical evidence base on how such trauma has significant and sometimes catastrophic impacts on the physical, emotional and psychological health of its victims.

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